Posts Tagged Good

Humiliation Is Not Good Parenting

Posted by on Saturday, 15 August, 2015

Humiliation Is Not Good Parenting
News from PJ Media:

There is a growing trend lately of parents taking to the internet to shame their children in a variety of ways for their bad behavior. In one, a mother beats her teen with a belt for sneaking out with boys. In another, a father shaves his son’s head into a balding “old man” haircut because he got bad grades, and in the most celebrated video yet, a mother punches her son in the face to get him out of the Baltimore riots. I have no desire to link these videos because to do so would be to continue the degradation and humiliation of these children (and parents). It isn’t that I don’t have empathy for the parents struggling to keep their kids on the right path. Parenting is not for the weak willed or timid. It’s hard, back-breaking work with no pay, major guilt, and very little sleep. I have had moments where I have considered recording my child’s screaming meltdowns just so her dad will believe me, but I don’t. Something holds me back.

Ephesians 6:4 says, “Fathers, do not provoke your children to anger, but bring them up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord……………. continues on PJ Media

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15 parenting fails and how to avoid them
News from Metro:

Where’s the instruction manual? (Picture: Getty)

As the cliche has it, babies don’t come with an instruction manual. That means most of us muddle through parenthood in a mix of confusion, fear and blind panic. Here are some common traps to avoid.

1. Covering yourself in glue, running through Mothercare and buying anything that sticks

Previous generations stuck their babies in drawers and managed fine without designer changing stations and specially designed nappy bins. Most parenting hardware is worthless, so ask your fellow parents what things they actually use before you go on a spending spree.

2. Buying everything new<…………… continues on Metro

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Single parent or poverty? Study looks at which affects good parenting most.

Posted by on Wednesday, 28 January, 2015

Single parent or poverty? Study looks at which affects good parenting most.
News from Christian Science Monitor:

Income level, rather than family structure, has the greatest impact on whether parents read to their children, eat dinner together, or engage in any number of positive parenting practices, according to a new report put out today by the nonpartisan Council on Contemporary Families.

For years, studies have suggested that single parents lag behind married couples when it comes to providing children the sort of enrichment activities that child development experts say have long-term impact on kids’ emotional and cognitive health, such as monitoring media access and facilitating participation in extracurricular activities. But it turns out that those differences all but disappear when income disparities are taken away, according to today’s report.

In other words, single moms are less likely to shuttle their children to sports practices not because they are parenting solo, but because they have fewer resources, explains Sandra Hofferth, professor of family science at the University of Maryland School of Public Health, who authored the paper.

“With a single parent, there’s only one earner…. When it comes to ferrying children to lessons or sports, they just can’t do it,” she says. “We found that parenting differs mostly because of resources – more so than by family structure.”

Take the sports example. Those children living in pove…………… continues on Christian Science Monitor

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‘Free-range parenting’ case unleashes national debate
News from Boston Globe:

By Donna St. George and Brigid SchulteWashington Post  January 25, 2015

WASHINGTON — Two days after the story of their children’s unsupervised walk home from a park became the latest flash point in an ongoing cultural debate about what constitutes responsible parenting, Danielle and Alexander Meitiv were still explaining their ‘‘old-fashioned’’ methods of child-rearing.

They eat dinner with their children. They enforce bedtimes, restrict screen times, and assign chores. They go to synagogue. More controversially, they let their 10-year-old son and 6-year-old daughter venture out together to walk or play without adults.

Continue reading below

‘‘How have we gotten so crazy that what was just a normal childhood a generation ago is considered radical?’’ Danielle Meitiv asked in the living room of her Silver Spring, Md., home as yet another news crew dropped by to question the couple.

She and her husband are facing an inquiry for neglect, they say, after allowing their children to wal…………… continues on Boston Globe

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Other Views: You can’t legislate good parenting

Posted by on Saturday, 7 June, 2014

Other Views: You can’t legislate good parenting
News from The Daily Advertiser:

5:36 p.m. CDT June 6, 2014

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Countryside Parenting Tips: Faith in a Child
News from Northbrook Star:

“A child, raised to believe he is worthy of love, celebrates the life he has been given in a way that makes a difference in the world”

In the months before our spring wedding, my love and I camped, hiked or backpacked every weekend, most often on the southern branches of the Appalachian Trail. Old trails led us to unexpected vistas, miles passed, sunlight faded, time stood still. Surprised by love, we needed that time to imagine our life together.

One of those weekends, we left the trail early Sunday morning to walk around a lake that bordered a campground. A congregation had gathered beneath a wooden shelter to worship, a motley crew of people who had walked to the service from tents and campers, children and dogs in tow. My love and I sat on a picnic bench outside the shelter, sang along when we knew the words, watched the sunlight dance on the lake, listened to a sermon that seems as urgently important twenty years later as it did on that day.

The service was ecumenical and haphazard, interrupted by barking dogs, crying babies, the cracking of logs in the brick fireplace. The preacher…………… continues on Northbrook Star

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Perspective on Parenting: Tips for finding a good summer sitter

Posted by on Sunday, 1 June, 2014

Perspective on Parenting: Tips for finding a good summer sitter
News from Daily Local News:

Warmer weather, longer days and a more carefree attitude have many of us singing: ?It?s summer time, and the living is easy.? Truthfully speaking, though, parents don?t always consider children home from school and requiring daily supervision an easy venture.

Working and stay-at-home parents alike juggle childcare in the summer months, when young children are on summer break. This is when some families, like ours, choose to hire either a part- or full-time caregiver to help lighten the load.

With so many college and high school students looking for summer employment, there?s usually no shortage of people willing to fill this role. But when it comes to our children, we obviously want a candidate who?s responsible, caring and trustworthy.

Here?s a true story ripped from the pages of my life as a parent. A few years ago, I ventured into the world of hiring summertime sitters. Despite feeling a little guilty about this because I?m primarily a stay-at-home mom, I was looking for some occasional relief. I had a 6-, 4- and 2-year-old who kept me on my toes constantly, so the opportunity to have a ?date night? with my husband or a reliable set of hands to help me out on a busy afternoon was appealing.

After screening applicants, I found a sweet, young lady via one of the well-known caregiving web sites popularly advertised. On what I…………… continues on Daily Local News

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Mom allowing fear to interfere with parenting decisions
News from SunHerald.com:

For the first five years of her life, it was just me and my now 13-year-old daughter. I didn’t have a clue as to what I was doing. I wasn’t consistent; I didn’t hold her accountable; I was an enabler. Her behavior toward me became increasingly disrespectful. My second husband tried to open my eyes, but I was in complete denial. Finally, in her pre-teen years, I started to hold her accountable and tried my best to be more consistent. Now, when she disrespects me I take privileges away, assign her extra chores, and send her to her room for the rest of the day. That seems to work, but only for a few days. Then it’s back to square one.

Things are especially awful after she spends time with her dad. Lately she’s been yelling that I don’t love her and she’s going to live with her dad once she turns 14. I recently went to take away her iPod for a day for defiant behavior. She threw the iPod down, causing it to break, which she blamed me for. Considering I can’t take her iPod away anymore, should I come up with a different consequence or is not allowing her to replace the broken one enough? I’m tempted to empty her room of everything she owns, but I wonder if that’s going too far, if it will completely destroy any chance of a relationship with her. HELP!

You’re obviously suffering from what I call “interFEARence,” meaning that you are allowing fear to interfere w…………… continues on SunHerald.com

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Are You a Good Friend to Your Grown-up Kid?

Posted by on Thursday, 20 June, 2013

Are You a Good Friend to Your Grown-up Kid?
News from AARP News:

En espa?ol | When your children reach their 20s, the balance of connection between you and them seesaws. The challenge becomes how to find common ground without overstepping the comfortable boundaries between you. The issues become how much time to spend together and how to spend it, how much information to share and about what, which battles to fight and when to turn the other cheek, what advice to give and when silence is golden.

In your new relationship with your adult child, listen more than you talk and keep doing what you love together. — Todd Wright/Blend Images/Getty Images

In interviews for our forthcoming book, When Will My Grown-Up Kid Grow Up?, 75 percent of parents said that their current

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UC Berkeley alumna gives talk on dangers of ‘tiger parenting’
News from Daily Californian:

UC Berkeley alumna Kim Wong Keltner will be holding an author talk in Berkeley this Saturday to discuss her recent memoir, “Tiger Babies Strike Back,” an account of her personal struggles being raised by an authoritarian and cold “tiger parenting” style.

Tiger parenting involves a rigid approach to raising children with strict rules and harsh punishments, a style Amy Chua associated with Asian-American immigrant parents in her 2011 bestselling book, “Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother.” According to research conducted by Qing Zhou, an assistant professor of psychology at UC Berkeley, and Stephen Chen, a postdoctoral fellow at UCSF, authoritarian parenting has been shown to result in negative outcomes later in a child’s life, resulting in symptoms such as depression, anxiety and poor social skills.

Keltner speaks out against tiger parenting in her memoir, citing the adverse social and cognitive effects as reasons to rise up against overly involved parenting and reclaim one’s life.

“My book is about being raised by strict parents — specifically, Asian parents — although this phenomenon is not restricted to Asian parents,” Keltner said. “I wanted to write a book for the rest of us who aren’t No. 1 in our class. I wanted to say there’s a different kind of success that can’t be measured by test scores and awards.”

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Parenting, Love and Loss (The Good Kind)

Posted by on Monday, 10 June, 2013

Parenting, Love and Loss (The Good Kind)
News from Huffington Post:

My son and his dad were out for a beer recently and his dad asked if he was afraid of anything as a child. Caleb replied that one of his childhood fears was not being a competent adult. Just in small, everyday ways — like he wasn’t sure he’d be able to read a map. His father had the same response I did upon hearing this: Why didn’t you just ask us to show you how to read a map? He said it seemed silly to ask. Sometimes our fears are half-buried anyway. They live vibrantly inside of us, but they don’t seem to relate to the outside world. I’ve had fears like that — some of them regard parenting. And wow, loads of other people are parents. Why does it seem so difficult to just ask someone how to read the map? Somehow it’s tough to say, “How do I do this?”

Of course, Caleb can indeed read a map, and he’s become a competent adult in most regards. That’s probably all that can be said for most of us who’ve aged into adulthood. We have it mostly figured out. Indeed, new skills are always unsteady. He’s a competent adult of 22 years — still new, yet quite able.

I know just how well he can read…………… continues on Huffington Post

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Is Will Smith’s Unconventional Parenting Good For His Kids?

Posted by on Wednesday, 15 May, 2013

Is Will Smith’s Unconventional Parenting Good For His Kids?
News from PerezHilton.com:

TIME Magazine may be a perennial periodical, but that doesn’t mean it can’t stay current!

The magazine is on its game this week, shifting whatever it had on deck around to focus on what everyone is talking about- Angelina Jolie‘s double mastectomy.

The venerated publication is approaching the issue not just in awe of Angie, as most of us are, but more specifically examining the ramifications of her decision.

The whole reason Angelina went public with her very private health issue was that she wanted to impact the way women were thinking about their own risk of breast and ovarian cancer- and it’s working!

Forget the cover- give her Person Of The Year!

The print issue of TIME will h…………… continues on PerezHilton.com

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Meredith buys Parenting, Babytalk from Bonnier
News from New York Business Journal:

Enlarge

Daniel Acker, Bloomberg

Meredith will send Parents magazine to current subscribers of Parenting, which is being acquired and closed.

Staff New York Business Journal

Meredith Corp. has bought Parenting and Babytalk magazines from The Bonnier Corp. and will cease publication of the magazines, folding the assets into rival magazines, American Baby and Parents.

Meredith (NYSE: MDP) didn’t disclose financial terms of the deal but said the acquisitions will not have a material effect on its financial performance.

About 15 jobs will be cut at Bonnier’s corporate offices in Winter Pa…………… continues on New York Business Journal

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Bad Things Happen to Good Parents: Digital Parenting Tips

Posted by on Wednesday, 27 March, 2013

Bad Things Happen to Good Parents: Digital Parenting Tips
News from Huffington Post:

Digital parenting is just plain hard. Tim Woda, co-founder of UknowKids.com, understands this and is trying to help parents in the Internet age.

“Answer me this — do you know who your child made friends with on Facebook yesterday?” Woda poses this question whenever he discusses Internet safety with concerned parents.

The common response is what you expect. Woda says most honest parents answer no, mostly because they are not that tuned in to the children’s Internet lives.

Woda should know. As a parent himself, he is dealing with these same struggles. Five years ago, Woda’s 14-year-old son accepted a friend-request from a friend-of-a-friend on Facebook. This new “friend” turned out to be an Internet sexual predator. Back then, Woda thought that he had taken a proactive measure toward Internet safety.

“We tried to do all of these things that the experts told us…………… continues on Huffington Post

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Social science struggles for data on effects of same-sex parenting on children
News from Washington Post:

Amid the legal arguments at Tuesday’s Supreme Court hearing on same-sex marriage, there loomed a social science question: How well do children turn out when they are raised by gay parents?

Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, who is widely considered the swing vote, called the topic “uncharted waters.” Conservative Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. wryly asked, “You want us to step in and render a decision based on an assessment of the effects of this institution which is newer than cellphones or the Internet?”

Video

The Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday on Proposition 8, the law voters passed in 2008 banning same-sex marriage in California. Listen to the complete arguments in the case known as H…………… continues on Washington Post

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Parenting Lounge:  Episode II

Video Rating: 5 / 5

Good Parenting 101: Mom turns son in after seeing him on tape stealing from 9 …

Posted by on Monday, 11 March, 2013

Good Parenting 101: Mom turns son in after seeing him on tape stealing from 9 …
News from New York Daily News:

PhiladelphiaPolice via YouTube

Parents turn their sons in after seeing a video put out by The Philadelphia Police Department, who was seeking the public’s assistance in identifying the suspects who robbed a 9 year-old 3rd grade student in East Germantown.

Parents turned their teenage sons in to cops after seeing surveillance footage of them allegedly stealing cash from a young girl, police have said.

Two couples from Philadelphia, Pa, contacted officers after seeing the images, allegedly of their sons taking $ 13 from a nine-year-old girl, during a television news appeal.

PhiladelphiaPolice via YouTube

Police released surveillance video of the crime. 

Cops put out a media request for help in identifying the suspects after the theft outside Jaquez Mini Market in East Germantown on Friday night.

Video shows the girl paying at the counter as the boys eye up her possessions. She then walks out, into the path of the boys, who grab her wallet and run.

PhiladelphiaPolice via YouTube

One mom recognized her son in the video and…………… continues on New York Daily News

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Tough Love and Parenting
News from AllAfrica.com:

It is the wish of every parent to be able to provide for their children and give them the life and trinkets they themselves were not able to have. One would think it is the natural order of things to aspire for an improved standard of living for their offspring. However, the million dollar question is, at what point does providing for your children and acquiescing to their many indulgences cross the line to what may be termed spoiling them?

Of late I have noted with concern particularly with the young generation of parents that they seem to have missed the point. Just last week, after knocking off from church I dashed by a coffee shop in Avondale from where I had ordered a birthday cake for my little girl who had just turned four and what I saw shocked me.

There was a young girl barely out of her diapers, her mother in tow and the youngster seemed to be giving her mother a torrid time as evidenced by the mother’s sunken face and the toddler’s intermittent tantrums. Naturally I was inclined to ask the mother what was the issue, she responded that her daughter was demanding she buy her everything they came across and was typically being a nuisance.

Being one from the old school of parenting I was quick to tell the toddler that if she continued her antics I was going to give her a taste of the belt treatment. The toddler stood there frozen in shock at…………… continues on AllAfrica.com

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Good parenting ‘is more important than a good school to a child’s academic …

Posted by on Thursday, 11 October, 2012

Good parenting ‘is more important than a good school to a child’s academic …
News from Daily Mail:

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Parenting gone wrong to blame for dip in learning standards among pupils
News from Daily Nation:

Are you there for your child as a parent? This question should jolt many Kenyan parents to think of improving their parenting style.

Many seem to have accepted the absentee parent syndrome as inevitable but then keep asking themselves: What has gone wrong with our young people?

I recently came across an interesting study by the Kenya National Examinations Council (Knec), which I will use to illustrate my concerns.

In 2010, Knec conducted an assessment of learner achievement among Standard Three pupils in public schools.

The council tested literacy and numeracy skills of 7,931 pupils to find out if they had acquired the expected skills.

They considered a number of factors that affect the learning outcomes, which include school and classroom conditions, learning facilities, teacher qualifications and learner characteristics. Family support for learners was also considered.

One of the findings that shocked many Kenyans was how little parents were involved in their children’s education.

In the research, nationally, 49 per cent of the pupils did not get any assistance with their homework.

Of the 51 per cent that reported getting help, 43.3 per cent got it from older siblings, 36.4 per cent fro…………… continues on Daily Nation

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