Posts Tagged divorced

Ask Amy: Divorced mom struggles by parenting halfway

Posted by on Friday, 12 December, 2014

Ask Amy: Divorced mom struggles by parenting halfway
News from Washington Post:

December 12 at 12:37 PM

DEAR AMY: I am divorced and have two young children. Their father and I share equal custody. I have had a boyfriend for a year. He has a young child of his own and we all live together as a blended family. This man is kind, sensitive, supportive and loving, everything my ex-husband was not.

There’s one problem. My kids tend to act up a lot and I’m not sure why. His child NEVER acts up. She’s helpful, listens, is easygoing, etc. My kids are the exact opposite!

This past year, my boyfriend has really been working with my kids on discipline and setting good examples, and so have I. I am an easygoing person but their dad is not. I think they get this trait from him. I don’t really know what goes on when they’re with him. When they come back to us, I feel like we’re going backward. My daughter (age 10) doesn’t act her age. She whines like a 3-year-old, is unhelpful around the house and with her younger brother, etc.

Now my boyfriend is showing hosti…………… continues on Washington Post

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The 5 C’s of Divorced Co-Parenting

Posted by on Friday, 6 July, 2012

The 5 C’s of Divorced Co-Parenting
News from Huffington Post:

However you may feel about your ex-spouse, if you have kids, you are still co-parenting. That’s right: “Co”. As long as you both are committed to the welfare of your children, you have to be in regular communication with each other and have to cooperate with each other about their care. You need to coordinate schedules and collaborate about everything from childcare arrangements to how and where holidays are spent. That “co” says it all. It means “joined”. It means “together”. It means “mutual”. It means that you can’t just refuse to deal with each other because the kids need you both.

Here are the 5 C’s that will make divorced co-parenting go more smoothly than your marriage did:

1) Comply with your divorce agreement. Chances are you spent a great deal of time, emotional energy and money hammering out who is responsible for what and when. Stick with it! If you don’t, the kids will feel the tension and overhear the complaints. If you find that the agreement doesn’t work for you, be sure that you don’t take it out on the kids either directly (by not picking them up on time) or indirectly (by not sending the check). Set up some mediation with their other parent and deal with it like adults.

2) Convey important information. You don’t need to share your per…………… continues on Huffington Post

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Parenting meetings for divorced parents to start in April

Posted by on Saturday, 10 March, 2012

Parenting meetings for divorced parents to start in April
News from Marin Independent-Journal:

THE COUNTY

Family Service Agency of Marin will offer a series of six meetings next month, “Parenting Apart: Education and Support for Co-Parenting After Separation or Divorce.”

Parents will learn skills that promote the healthy development of their children and help manage conflict with the other parent. The class focuses on positive actions parents can take for the benefit of the children.

Only one parent from a couple attends the series at a time; participation by the other parent at a later series is not necessary, though encouraged. An in-person interview is required before admission to the class; interviews are scheduled no later than one week before the class begins.

The classes begin April 18 both in the evening, from 6 to 7:30 p.m., and daytime, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; free child care is offered during the evening slot. Fees are on a sliding scale based on family income; rates vary from $ 15 to $ 40 per meeting.

For information or to schedule an interview, call 491-5723.

Family Service Agency is in Terra Linda, across the street from the Northgate mall at 555 Northgate Drive.

Send us your news: We want more news items from Marin’s cities and towns. Email them to our City Desk at localn…………… continues on Marin Independent-Journal

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Parents believe 30s are ‘optimal age for parenting’
News from Daily News & Analysis:

Most people who have their first child after the age of 40 feel that the “optimal age for parenting” is in the 30s, according to a small new study.

They maintained that older parenting has more advantages than disadvantages.

The University of California, San Francisco, study was limited to 107 people, most of them white, married and with above-average incomes. The authors said future research should include a more diverse group and should follow up on the older parents once their children reach the teens.

Researchers interviewed 46 couples and 15 single women who had used in vitro fertilization (IVF) to conceive their first child when the woman was 40 or older.

80 % of the women and 70% of the men who were study participants said 30s was the best age for parenting, and many indicated that it was only their circumstances that kept them from becoming parents then.

The participants were asked what they thought were the advantages and disadvantages of becoming a parent at this point in their lives.

“A majority of women and men in the study believed that childbearing later in life resulted in advantages fo…………… continues on Daily News & Analysis

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