Archive for April, 2015

Free-Range Parenting: Teaching Independence, Or Child Neglect?

Posted by on Saturday, 25 April, 2015

Free-Range Parenting: Teaching Independence, Or Child Neglect?
News from CBS Local:

SILVER SPRING, Md. (WJZ) — Two Maryland parents are in the fight of their lives, trying to raise their children the way they want. The government claims what they’re doing is dangerous—but is it?

Jessica Kartalija with an in-depth look at a small, but growing movement called “free-range” parenting.

On a recent afternoon, two Maryland children are doing what they typically do–walking by speeding cars, crossing busy streets.

And while they’re only six and ten-years-old, Dvora and Rafi Meitiv are frequently alone with no adult supervision.

It’s something their mother actually encourages.

“They’re urban kids growing up in an urban area, and one of the most important skills that we taught them–how to cross busy streets,” their mother, Danielle Meitiv, said.

Dvora and Rafi not only walk home alone, they go to the park alone and to the store alone.

“As they show more maturity, we gave them more responsibility,” their mother said.

Reporter: “What have you done to prepare your kids to be more independent?”

Mother: “They started playing in the yard, then, you know, they were allowed in front of the house, then around the corner. They know the boundaries.”

This controversial parenting style–quietly going on for years–unnoticed– until a passerby calls the police.

Someone saw the kids wal…………… continues on CBS Local

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‘Adult Onset’: the joys and terrors of single parenting
News from The Seattle Times (registration):

Canadian author Ann-Marie MacDonald’s new novel “Adult Onset” is a pitch-perfect account of solo parenting, as seen through the eyes of one mother of two young children whose partner leaves town to direct a play.

‘Adult Onset’

by Ann-Marie MacDonald

Tin House Books, 381 pp., $ 25.95

Ann-Marie MacDonald’s latest novel, “Adult Onset,” tracks a week in the life of Mary Rose MacKinnon.

A famous author of young adult novels, Mary Rose is stalled on starting the last book of a popular trilogy and taking care of her two young children while her partner, who is focusing on her career, is directing a play out of town.

To that end, it’s the most accurate description of solo parenting I’ve ever read, not so much juggling a number of tasks from the seemingly simple (answering one email) to crucial (keeping scissors away from a toddler) as trying to keep from drowning under them. MacDonald, an acclaimed Canadian author, nails both the hilarity and the crippling anxiety of day-to-day life, revealing they’re not necessarily mutually exclusive, as well as the internal struggle between needing help and believing one should be capable of handling all this without it.

The novel starts with an email from Mary Rose’s father, which triggers the memory of a c…………… continues on The Seattle Times (registration)

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I do not own DBZ. Clips taken from Alternate Reality Dragon Ball Z done by SSJGozar, Vegeta’s such an awesome father.

Praise for Heather Locklear’s Co-Parenting Vacation With Ex Richie Sambora

Posted by on Friday, 17 April, 2015

Praise for Heather Locklear’s Co-Parenting Vacation With Ex Richie Sambora
News from Yahoo Parenting:

Ava Sambora’s parents Heather Locklear and Richie Sambora have this divorced parenting thing down. Experts tell Yahoo Parenting why all co-parents could take a page from their playbook. (Photo: Coleman-Rayner). 

The scene couldn’t have been more romantic, with the crystal blue ocean at their feet and towering mountains behind them as bikini-clad Heather Locklear posed for a picture in Bora Bora with Richie Sambora, arm around her shoulder. But this was no sexy getaway. The photo is just one of many images of the exes enjoying a trip to French Polynesia with their 17-year-old daughter Ava. 

STORY: How to Parent Together After You’ve Split 

“[They] wanted to spend quality time together with Ava as a family,” a rep for the Bon Jovi rocker, 55, tells

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‘Free-range parenting’ vs. child neglect: Your Say

Posted by on Wednesday, 15 April, 2015

‘Free-range parenting’ vs. child neglect: Your Say
News from USA TODAY:

USA TODAY 9:42 p.m. EDT April 14, 2015

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See 19 of the best inspirational parenting tips to brighten your day
News from Today.com:

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It’s always nice to learn practical solutions for parenting dilemmas. Kid won’t take yucky medicine? Give him a couple of chocolate chips to melt in his mouth and disguise the taste. Boom! Medicine down the hatch.

But sometimes, parenting challenges can’t be solved with a clever hack. Sometimes you need to take a deep breath and recharge your soul. We mined this month’s contributions from the TODAY Parenting Team to come up with this stellar compilation of 19 nuggets of wisdom that just may help thwart some parenting stre…………… continues on Today.com

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‘Free-range’ kids and our parenting police state

Posted by on Wednesday, 15 April, 2015

‘Free-range’ kids and our parenting police state
News from Washington Post:

Earlier this year Danielle and Alexander Meitiv were investigated by Montgomery County after letting their children, 10 and 6, walk home alone from a park a mile away from their house. (Jorge Ribas/The Washington Post)

Columnist April 13

They were coming home from a park, on this gorgeous, blossoming weekend, after playing.

And for this, a 10-year-old and his 6-year-old sister ended up in the back of a squad car……………. continues on Washington Post

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Couple’s “free-range” parenting style raises concerns
News from WFSB:

Rachel Wickware likes to keep her children close.

CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO (KFVS) – For the second time in four months, police in Maryland picked up two children as they walked home alone from a park that is about a mile from their house.

Instead of taking them home this time, police took the children, ages 6 and 10, to child protective services.

The parents believe in “free-range” parenting, which includes letting their children play and walk alone in the neighborhood to teach them self-reliance and responsibility.

Rachel Wickware, a parent in Cape Girardeau, would likely disagree.

She keeps a tight rein on her kids.

“They don’t get out of my sight to often,” Wickware said. “They are always close by. They don’t go too far without mommy.”

Wickware says the days of staying out until the street lights come on are long gone.

“Someone is always out looking to prowl with your kids or take them,” Wickware said. “You can’t trust no body now days. And I don’t trust no body.”

Licensed counselor Bob Dale, a therapist for the Dale and Hancock Center, blames technology.

“We’re concerned about what they are doing with their smartphones, what they are doing with their tablets, what they are doing with their computers, what other people are transmitting to them via internet a…………… continues on WFSB

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Dr. Randy Cale’s Terrific Parenting: Part II On consistency: Routines and …

Posted by on Sunday, 12 April, 2015

Dr. Randy Cale’s Terrific Parenting: Part II On consistency: Routines and …
News from Troy Record:

In this series on consistency, we are addressing three aspects of daily family life where consistency is critical. Last week we discussed consistency in setting limits. In this week’s article, we will explore the importance of consistency in daily routines and how to bring about those changes.

First, why consistent routines matter

Daily routines either create predictability or not. This is essential to understand.

Predictability brings ease and promotes a sense of certainty about the world and how it operates. This makes life easier for kids, and for parents.

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The more the landscape of daily life is changing constantly and modifications are endless, there is the opposite. In other words, children internally feel unsettled and anxious about the ever changing world. “What’s next?” is the ever present internal thought, inside the child’s world, that severely limits the degree of peace that can be found.

And perhaps most obvious from a practical level, inconsistent routines cause many more challenges with behavior. You have to work harder, speak (i.e., nag, remind, prod, push, negotiate, argue, etc.) more often and inevitably get more frustrated and upset. Why? Because the lack of predictability means that you try to manage their behavior with your words, rather than having a…………… continues on Troy Record

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Parenting: 13-year-old’s birthday wish takes off
News from The News-Press:

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